A virtual private server is a single physical server, split up between a limited number of users. It is a similar hosting set-up to a shared server, where many user accounts are located on the same server. The main difference between these two server setups is that VPS accounts have fewer users per box, and the users get more control over their section of the server. Virtualization software divides the users from each other, although you’re not entirely isolated from being affected by other people on your server.
In operating-system-level virtualization, a physical server is virtualized at the operating system level, enabling multiple isolated and secure virtualized servers to run on a single physical server. The "guest" operating system environments share the same running instance of the operating system as the host system. Thus, the same operating system kernel is also used to implement the "guest" environments, and applications running in a given "guest" environment view it as a stand-alone system. The pioneer implementation was FreeBSD jails; other examples include Docker, Solaris Containers, OpenVZ, Linux-VServer, LXC, AIX Workload Partitions, Parallels Virtuozzo Containers, and iCore Virtual Accounts.
You have to look at several factors when deciding between a managed and unmanaged VPS. One consideration is cost; a managed VPS is going to cost a little more than an unmanaged one. However, the price gap between the two has narrowed considerably over the past few years. You also have to factor time into the equation. If you are spending tons of time working on your server – is your company losing money? Would it be worth it to simply go with a managed setup? Those are questions you have to ask yourself.  Managed servers also have better security, on average, than unmanaged servers, because the web hosting company is responsible for making sure that your site is secure. Finally, unmanaged servers have the advantage of a slightly higher level of control than managed servers, but most people do not notice the difference.
For a limited time, all VPS Hosting plans come with Launch Assist included free. Our Launch Assist service includes two hours of time with our team of System Administrators and is meant to help make your onboarding or transition to InMotion Hosting as painless as possible. During this time, you can request assistance with website transfers, server optimizations and configurations, security layers and much more!
VPS hosting, on the other hand, provides you with dedicated resources that you don’t need to share. Every virtual private server hosting plan makes sure that you get the highest control of your resources. Control your CPUs, Burst RAM, manage root access and use your preferred OS. The downside of VPS hosting is that, while we cover the back-end and server monitoring, maintaining it 24/7, we can provide limited help to your project concerning customer support. While all VPS hosting and control panel questions we will help with, programming, coding and other queries of similar nature won't be covered.
It is very rare for a customer to exceed normal usage while managing a website. Typically, customers only experience issues if they use their accounts for storage (for example large multimedia files) or file sharing. Our hosting services are not intended to support these activities, and in accordance with our Terms of Service your disk space and bandwidth usage must be integrated into the normal operation of a website. We offer various plans that better address high bandwidth and large storage requirements. Please contact us for details.

This is a low cost option for the hosting company and they will usually offer some kind of data protection using a RAID system where data is copied across multiple disks. This is an entry level solution but one issue is that the server itself represents a single point of failure. It could be that the power supply fails which brings the server down for example.
The leftover disk space in a VPS plan can be used to store private backups of important files. It’s cheaper to use cloud-based storage The Cloud Storage Showdown - Dropbox, Google Drive, SkyDrive & More The Cloud Storage Showdown - Dropbox, Google Drive, SkyDrive & More The cloud storage scene has heated up recently, with a long-awaited entry by Google and a revamped SkyDrive from Microsoft. Dropbox has gone unchallenged by the major players for a long time, but that’s changed... Read More from a price-per-gigabyte perspective, but if you’re already using a VPS for some other reason and you have leftover space, you might as well think of it as free file storage.
OpenVZ virtualization is an OS level container-based virtualization, and it has resources that are divided between users on a physical server. Each container acts like a stand-alone virtual server and can be accessed with a root (SSH) connection. As a separate server container can be rebooted separately, it also has a dedicated IP address, shared RAM, individual processes, files, applications, system libraries and configuration files. On OpenVZ, the kernel cannot be modified. It has its stable version and modules cannot be added. The good thing regarding this virtualization is a faster performance, and a lower need of resources.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[citation needed]
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