If you’re outgrowing your shared web hosting or simply want more control, a managed or fully managed Virtual Private Server (VPS) is the next logical choice for your hosting needs. It gives you more freedom with root access to Apache and PHP, plus you can install an SSL certificate, as well as any type of software – all without the responsibility of a dedicated server.
VMs on ESXi run Windows and Linux operating systems near flawlessly. It’s also a powerhouse for many sizeable virtual desktop deployments running on VMware View or Citrix XenDesktop. And more recently VMware was in the news because they will soon power Google’s Chrome virtual desktop cloud and provide access to Windows application. How cool is that!
Since the 90’s VMware has been evolving. It started as a clumsy little software that used to be installed on a Windows desktop. Then from there, it changed into GSX for Windows Servers. And then again it morphed into ESX which eliminated the need for Windows and booted to a Redhat kernel. And later in version 4, it became ESXi which now runs on a custom Linux kernel.

When purchasing a VPS hosting package the web hosting provider will manage all the hardware and while you will have administrative access through a control panel to do whatever you want with your server, they will still make sure that it is available, has up-to-date system software, it is secured and has the available hardware resources to run according to the VPS package specification.
Cloud hosting: This type of hosting is slightly more expensive than shared hosting (similarly priced to VPS hosting). Rather than using a single server to store and load your site, a cloud system distributes resources across many different computers for faster response times. However, this model typically doesn’t give you root access, and its distributed structure presents fundamental security challenges.
Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) lets you provision a logically isolated section of the AWS Cloud where you can launch AWS resources in a virtual network that you define. You have complete control over your virtual networking environment, including selection of your own IP address range, creation of subnets, and configuration of route tables and network gateways. You can use both IPv4 and IPv6 in your VPC for secure and easy access to resources and applications.
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