A virtual private server (VPS), also called a virtual dedicated server (VDS), is a virtual server that appears to the user as a dedicated server, but that is actually installed on a computer serving multiple websites. A single computer can have several VPSs, each one with its own operating system (OS) that runs the hosting software for a particular user.
A leading contributor to several large projects, an excellent open-source OS that provides a phenomenal experience right off the bat. Rolling releases will keep you on the cutting edge. Stable, performance oriented and backed up by a large community. Open Suse is great for projects due to the ability to make snapshots easily. Pair Open Suse and Hostinger VPS hosting to get the perfect platform.
VMs on ESXi run Windows and Linux operating systems near flawlessly. It’s also a powerhouse for many sizeable virtual desktop deployments running on VMware View or Citrix XenDesktop. And more recently VMware was in the news because they will soon power Google’s Chrome virtual desktop cloud and provide access to Windows application. How cool is that!

A VPN server is a machine on the internet that runs VPN software. A VPN client can connect to that server, and all data that travels between the client and the server is encrypted. If you wanted to connect to a website on the internet but didn’t want anyone, even your ISP, to see which site it was or the data your were sending, you could connect via a VPN. All an observer would be able to see is that you connected to the VPN server.
The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.
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