koding.com has a free VM running Ubuntu. The specs are pretty good, 1 gig memory for example. They have a terminal online you can access through their website, or use SSH. The VM will go to sleep approximately 20 minutes after you log out. The reason is to discourage users from running live production code on the VM. The VM resides behind a proxy. Running web servers that only speak HTTP (port 80) should work just fine, but I think you'll get into a lot of trouble whenever you want to work directly with other ports. Many mind-like alternatives offer similar setups. Good luck!
With support for Linux, Windows Server, SQL Server, Oracle, IBM, and SAP, Azure Virtual Machines gives you the flexibility of virtualization for a wide range of computing solutions—development and testing, running applications, and extending your datacenter. It’s the freedom of open-source software configured the way you need it. It’s as if it was another rack in your datacenter, giving you the power to deploy an application in seconds instead of weeks.
If you register a domain with Bluehost when signing up for a hosting account, there is a domain fee that is non-refundable. This not only covers our costs, but ensures that you won't lose your domain name. Regardless of the status of your hosting service, you'll be free to manage it, transfer it after any required lock periods, or simply point it elsewhere at your convenience. You retain ownership of your domain until the end of its registration period unless you elect to extend it. 

I was running a small private weather website in AWS and the satellite images got "picked up" by a news website and they regularly use them during major weather evenings. AWS' 12c per GB of outbound network traffic made things expensive and VPSServer makes this a lot more manageable and has excellent data volumes included with the price of the VPS. I also get many more CPUs for the price compared to AWS, so I am a happy customer.
Because you only are using a portion of the resources for the VM, you can have several of them running on one computer or server, as is common with hosting services. A hosting provider that offers VPS hosting has a vast number of physical servers that each contain multiple virtual machines. While demarcation and intrusion prevention within the physical machine is not a huge concern on your own PC, VPS hosts must have security safeguards in place to ensure isolation of each customer’s server. That’s why the terminology virtual private server is used – to denote the attention paid to privacy and the server programs that are typically loaded onto this type of VM.
Speaking of email and limits, you'll want the ability to create an unlimited number of accounts. Should your website grow significantly, you'll appreciate being able to scale your email accounts without spending additional money. Web hosts typically place a cap on the amount of storage per email account. In other words, you may be able to create an unlimited number of email accounts, but each one may have a 10GB storage cap. Take time to investigate a potential web host's email offerings so as not to be surprised by its messaging limitations. Again, find out what the unlimited gotchas might be.
If your bandwidth usage is high and your website seems slow to perform, you may need more resources than a shared website hosting plan provides. Shared hosting means you share everything - so you're restricted in how big your website can grow, and your available resources (disk space, bandwidth, etc) can be affected by the traffic flow and bandwidth usage of other websites running on the same server.
Lightweight, fast and reliable - these are the core tenets of CentOS. It is one of the best Enterprise-level operating systems that aims for speed and stability, without cutting out security. Inspired by Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS is also a formidable option for VPS hosting. When in doubt, pick the go-to web server operating system around the world. Power, robustness, and flexibility guaranteed!
You can easily customize the network configuration for your Amazon VPC. For example, you can create a public-facing subnet for your web servers that has access to the Internet, and place your backend systems such as databases or application servers in a private-facing subnet with no Internet access. You can leverage multiple layers of security, including security groups and network access control lists, to help control access to Amazon EC2 instances in each subnet.
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