VPS is the abbreviation for the term Virtual Private Server. As this name suggests, there is a difference between VPS hosting and shared hosting. The system can run multiple virtual machines (the VPS) on a physical server. So you can use all the advantages and features of a dedicated server, just in a virtual form. Virtual machines have long been used by computer giants like IBM and HP, but VPS hosting is also gaining in popularity among Internet hosting providers.
In the world of web hosting, there are many options for how to manage the computers that run a website, and it can be difficult to figure out what might be best for you. Since enterprise websites require the full resources of a server (or multiple servers) to ensure optimal performance for the site’s users, it’s important to make sure the best hosting option is chosen. When deciding upon those options, the choice often comes down to one of two possible approaches: dedicated or virtual hosting. Should you use your own physical server dedicated solely to you, or should you use a virtual server, which uses software to emulate a physical server on a virtual host? Let’s look at the pros and cons of each option:
InMotion Hosting offers 24x7x365 support with all VPS Hosting plans. We take pride in providing the best customer support on the market, giving you access to our team of experts via telephone, email, chat or Knowledge Center. We also provide Managed Hosting for a nominal cost, providing you with a dedicated system administrator to help with any technical difficulties you may encounter while setting up or maintaining your Virtual Private Server.

The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.

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