Way of using resources In the case of shared hosting, websites and / or applications residing on the server make use of resources and available server capacity at the same time. In the case of VPS hosting, each websites and / or applications residing on the server is being allotted a virtually distinct server.  Here a separate, exclusive server is often rented.
So that could be either a virtual machine - an operating system running inside another operating system, or a virtual private server - you rent a virtual server from a company, so you have your own internet-facing server running 24/7 relatively cheap (since it's not a real server, but one of many virtual server running on an actual server). I think he might have meant the later, since you'd have to run a snartnofe (btw I love that name) non stop to benefit from it.
A VPS is not the same as a dedicated server, but it gives the illusion of being one. A good Web developer can do almost anything on a VPS that they would want to do on dedicated server, however, a VPS hosting plan is substantially less expensive, comes with technical support, and the hardware behind a VPS is not your responsibility. Sure, cheap servers can be acquired, but they will require a far larger overhead in terms of physical security and technical maintenance, security and support. Ultimately, a VPS can be the perfect solution when you need more flexibility and features than a shared hosting plan, but are not in the market for your own dedicated hosting server.

Guaranteed private server resources is our credo! We will never oversell our cloud based VPS, so all your websites will always run with top level performance and incredibly high speed. You can never go wrong with our own top-notch dedicated servers, loaded with the latest Intel Xeon processors, terabytes of SSD disk space and 128 GB of RAM per server. These state-of-art servers will guarantee you the ultimate computing power and blazing fast speed.
I was running a small private weather website in AWS and the satellite images got "picked up" by a news website and they regularly use them during major weather evenings. AWS' 12c per GB of outbound network traffic made things expensive and VPSServer makes this a lot more manageable and has excellent data volumes included with the price of the VPS. I also get many more CPUs for the price compared to AWS, so I am a happy customer.

The primary disadvantage to using a VPS is its lack of performance. The organization that provides the VPS will typically throttle the server's performance in an effort to maximize the number of VPSs that the physical server is able to accommodate. In the unlikely event that the VPS's performance is not throttled, it then becomes possible for an adjacent VPS to consume excessive resources, to the point of impacting the VPS's performance.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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