cPanel will do almost everything for you (until things go wrong) but you still need to know how to use bash and yum, how to secure your VPS, and how to troubleshoot your own connectivity issues at a minimum if you decide to roll with an unmanaged service... also, whenever WHM/cPanel sends you an e-mail alert you should read it and follow any links to WHM/cPanel documentation - our support team had far too many cPanel tickets in which the subscriber forwarded along the alert after ignoring the link which described how to solve the problem.
The two environments have plenty of overlapping qualities, but most importantly Dedicated Server render greater security, customization and excellent availability. With granular control, you are free to customize hardware components like disk space or RAM and installation of unique operating systems. More substantial computing power (CPUs) and disk space allow Dedicated servers enhanced performance for high amounts of traffic. When uptime and performance are critical to your business Dedicated Servers are second to none for hosting.
Way of using resources	In the case of shared hosting, websites and / or applications residing on the server make use of resources and available server capacity at the same time.	In the case of VPS hosting, each websites and / or applications residing on the server is being allotted a virtually distinct server.	 Here a separate, exclusive server is often rented.

The golden rule for unmanaged VPS hosting is this: If you have a problem with your unmanaged VPS Account, it is your problem. If the problem is software related, resource related, performance related, need troubleshooting or configuration of software, or need general help understanding Unix or server applications, you are on your own and should not expect help from the web host.

Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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