VPS hosting is essentially a virtual slice of a server which you can scale to your own needs with your own dedicated resources. At Hostek, we never over-sell server capacity, in fact we operate in a highly available server environment and, on top of that, we’ll transfer you to another available server space in the event that your host server goes down.
Perhaps the best way to approach the virtual server is the idea of a virtual machine. A VM allows you to run an emulation of a computer within your computer, drawing on the resources of the physical one –  disk space, RAM, CPU, etc. This tactic allows you to run an entirely separate operating system (OS) solely for the purposes of the VM, even if its type and version of OS are identical to what’s on your hardware.
If you want a larger selection of software options that you'll be able to install on your VPS with a single click, we recommend our Softaculous Premium solution. You'll be able to 1-click setup the web's most popular software solutions including WordPress. Choose from a number of other solutions as well including Joomla, Drupal, Ghost and so many more.

A leading contributor to several large projects, an excellent open-source OS that provides a phenomenal experience right off the bat. Rolling releases will keep you on the cutting edge. Stable, performance oriented and backed up by a large community. Open Suse is great for projects due to the ability to make snapshots easily. Pair Open Suse and Hostinger VPS hosting to get the perfect platform.


cPanel will do almost everything for you (until things go wrong) but you still need to know how to use bash and yum, how to secure your VPS, and how to troubleshoot your own connectivity issues at a minimum if you decide to roll with an unmanaged service... also, whenever WHM/cPanel sends you an e-mail alert you should read it and follow any links to WHM/cPanel documentation - our support team had far too many cPanel tickets in which the subscriber forwarded along the alert after ignoring the link which described how to solve the problem.
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web... See Full Bio

That’s a download from TechNet from Microsoft that I have this ISO file from so go ahead and open that one and then I’ll just start the install in here. And there are only a few things I will need to do to actually get this fully installed. Oh during this install process and it’s fine I want to install it now. Until you install the VirtualBox additions in here the mouse can be a little sluggish especially if you’re on a remote desktop environment but I just want to see my 40 gig hard drive. Just click Next and now it’s expanding the windows files the first percent here takes a little longer. The total process of installing windows in here is probably going to be six-seven minutes in total but I going to remove some of this recording here.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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