VPS is a fantastic solution if your website has outgrown the space offered on a shared hosting plan, especially if you run multiple high-traffic websites. While dedicated servers are a big financial and technical investment, VPS offers an "in between" option that offers great flexibility and scope for a savvy Web developer without the hefty price tag.
This promotional offer will let you enjoy a $1.12/month off the price of your VPS SSD2, VPS SSD3, VPS CLOUD 1, VPS CLOUD 2, VPS CLOUD 3, VPS CLOUD RAM 1, VPS CLOUD RAM 2, VPS CLOUD RAM 3 (VPS SSD Discover offers not included), with a twelve-month (12) commitment to the OVH VPS offer on any order placed between 01/01/2019 at 9:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) and 02/24/2019 at 9:00 a.m. (EST). The time that OVH registers the order will stand in the event of a dispute. On the renewal date, the VPS can be renewed for the price indicated, at the following site: www.ovh.com/world. Subscription is subject to prior acceptance of OVH Terms and Conditions.
Most people are clueless about the virtual servers hosting and how they actually work on the shared environment. It is a known fact that thousand and more number of users tend to use a server at a time. In such circumstances, each user is allocated with a designated amount of disk space, bandwidth, CPU allocation, memory and Operating System, which can be used on the server. All the Virtual Private Server users share the same CPU and RAM and think that, they have dedicated set of hardware. Virtual Server software is loaded onto the physical system and from then, a virtual server is ready to be used.
A VPS hosting provider relies on virtualization software, called a hypervisor, to abstract resources on a physical server and provide customers with access to an emulated server, called a virtual machine (VM). Each virtual machine runs a complete operating system, and has restricted access to a portion of the physical server's compute, memory and storage resources. Customers have access to the VM's OS, but not to the physical server.

Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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