Lightweight, fast and reliable - these are the core tenets of CentOS. It is one of the best Enterprise-level operating systems that aims for speed and stability, without cutting out security. Inspired by Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS is also a formidable option for VPS hosting. When in doubt, pick the go-to web server operating system around the world. Power, robustness, and flexibility guaranteed!
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
It works quite like shared hosting, as both of them are virtual hosting. However, shared hosting does not allow to extend or modify server settings. VPS hosting is more like a dedicated physical server on a virtual platform. You can manage and set up VPS for your requirements, as it is a separate server. Also, VPS server can be operated by a control panel that can be installed with a few clicks from the client system or the terminal command line. It means that you can even choose the same control panel as it is on shared hosting.
Get the control panel you prefer by selecting it at order time. Either is available - it's strictly a matter of personal preference. Many people opt for cPanel, because of its popularity - and we can't fault them for that. However, it’s your VPS – so you’re in control - you can have other control panels and software installed instead - it's totally up to you (but faster setup times if you pick cPanel or DirectAdmin).
A VPS is not the same as a dedicated server, but it gives the illusion of being one. A good Web developer can do almost anything on a VPS that they would want to do on dedicated server, however, a VPS hosting plan is substantially less expensive, comes with technical support, and the hardware behind a VPS is not your responsibility. Sure, cheap servers can be acquired, but they will require a far larger overhead in terms of physical security and technical maintenance, security and support. Ultimately, a VPS can be the perfect solution when you need more flexibility and features than a shared hosting plan, but are not in the market for your own dedicated hosting server.

During the Nutanix demo, Andy did what he does better than anyone I know – he drew a full stack of Nutanix on the whiteboard and covered the hyperconverged technology from end to end. I was intrigued by Andy’s presentation of hyperconvergence. For more information see the results of Gartner’s Peer Insights: Nutanix vs VMware Review. Some folks say Nutanix is the solution to the VMware tax.


When purchasing a VPS hosting package the web hosting provider will manage all the hardware and while you will have administrative access through a control panel to do whatever you want with your server, they will still make sure that it is available, has up-to-date system software, it is secured and has the available hardware resources to run according to the VPS package specification.

You can move corporate applications to the cloud, launch additional web servers, or add more compute capacity to your network by connecting your VPC to your corporate network. Because your VPC can be hosted behind your corporate firewall, you can seamlessly move your IT resources into the cloud without changing how your users access these applications. You can select "VPC with a Private Subnet Only and Hardware VPN Access" from the Amazon VPC console wizard to create a VPC that supports this use case.
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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