Self-Managed VPS customers have to make sure everything works the way they configure them and perform updates themselves. Obviously, this is not a job for novice users. It is probably not even a job for someone who does not feel comfortable managing services and scripts themselves. If in doubt, you should probably stick with a Managed VPS product and focus, instead, on growing your business and optimizing your site.
For a limited time, all VPS Hosting plans come with Launch Assist included free. Our Launch Assist service includes two hours of time with our team of System Administrators and is meant to help make your onboarding or transition to InMotion Hosting as painless as possible. During this time, you can request assistance with website transfers, server optimizations and configurations, security layers and much more!
It works quite like shared hosting, as both of them are virtual hosting. However, shared hosting does not allow to extend or modify server settings. VPS hosting is more like a dedicated physical server on a virtual platform. You can manage and set up VPS for your requirements, as it is a separate server. Also, VPS server can be operated by a control panel that can be installed with a few clicks from the client system or the terminal command line. It means that you can even choose the same control panel as it is on shared hosting.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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