If you want to customize your Web hosting server or need more technical flexibility than shared hosting, but the price tag of a dedicated server is prohibitive, then a VPS can be a brilliant option. You get full root-level access to install and delete software, set permissions, create accounts and determine your customized server environment – but because you are still sharing hardware you don't have to be concerned about the physical server maintenance and security.
VPS hosting is essentially a virtual slice of a server which you can scale to your own needs with your own dedicated resources. At Hostek, we never over-sell server capacity, in fact we operate in a highly available server environment and, on top of that, we’ll transfer you to another available server space in the event that your host server goes down.
cPanel will do almost everything for you (until things go wrong) but you still need to know how to use bash and yum, how to secure your VPS, and how to troubleshoot your own connectivity issues at a minimum if you decide to roll with an unmanaged service... also, whenever WHM/cPanel sends you an e-mail alert you should read it and follow any links to WHM/cPanel documentation - our support team had far too many cPanel tickets in which the subscriber forwarded along the alert after ignoring the link which described how to solve the problem.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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