If your bandwidth usage is high and your website seems slow to perform, you may need more resources than a shared website hosting plan provides. Shared hosting means you share everything - so you're restricted in how big your website can grow, and your available resources (disk space, bandwidth, etc) can be affected by the traffic flow and bandwidth usage of other websites running on the same server.

A VPS is not the same as a dedicated server, but it gives the illusion of being one. A good Web developer can do almost anything on a VPS that they would want to do on dedicated server, however, a VPS hosting plan is substantially less expensive, comes with technical support, and the hardware behind a VPS is not your responsibility. Sure, cheap servers can be acquired, but they will require a far larger overhead in terms of physical security and technical maintenance, security and support. Ultimately, a VPS can be the perfect solution when you need more flexibility and features than a shared hosting plan, but are not in the market for your own dedicated hosting server.


If you already have a number of clients hosted with various other cPanel-based hosts, our VPS Hosting plans all come with Launch Assist, 2 free hours of time with our System Administrators that can be used for migrating your sites. cPanel also has a powerful interface for transferring multiple accounts, providing you have root and SSH access to your current server. This transfer tool, which has step-by-step walkthrough and documentation on the cPanel site, was created to help designers, developers and agencies to quickly and easily move a number of accounts from one server to another.
You may also think that since you've customized your VPS, that you're stuck with the resources that you originally selected when you created your account. That's not true either. If you need additional resources after signing up for your account, that's just a sign that your site is growing. It's a sign of success. You shouldn't be penalized because for this success. That's why our VPS plans are completely scalable. Just contact our support team when you need more resources and we'll be happy to help.

Most people are clueless about the virtual servers hosting and how they actually work on the shared environment. It is a known fact that thousand and more number of users tend to use a server at a time. In such circumstances, each user is allocated with a designated amount of disk space, bandwidth, CPU allocation, memory and Operating System, which can be used on the server. All the Virtual Private Server users share the same CPU and RAM and think that, they have dedicated set of hardware. Virtual Server software is loaded onto the physical system and from then, a virtual server is ready to be used.


The web and server hosting world is full of abbreviations that look as though they were designed to confuse inexperienced hosting clients: IaaS, PaaS, SSD, SSL, VPN, VPS, and many more. It’s especially confusing when abbreviations are similar, but mean completely different things, as is the case with VPN and VPS. I’ve often heard hosting clients say VPN when they mean VPS, and vice versa.
In order to gain a better understanding of this popular hosting option, you need to first understand dedicated server hosting and what a VPS actually is. Dedicated servers provide many benefits, such as security, privacy, and a range of dedicated resources. With a dedicated server, there’s no competing with other websites for storage space, bandwidth, and speed. It truly is ideal for dynamic websites or any large enterprise-level site with hundreds or thousands of daily visitors.

Hello Joe, I don’t do much techie work for myself – my husband it the geek and runs the office. But this is very interesting. So based on what I can tell, I’m able to install a hypervisor software on my Windows or Mac computer and then install another operating system. This is amazing and I’m not sure we offer this pc service for our customers. I will need to try this with virtualbox on my new Dell laptop.
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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