VPS hosting contains the best elements of shared hosting and dedicated hosting services. Like shared hosting, VPS hosting puts your website on a server that also has other sites running on it, except that there are fewer sites per server. The sites share the cost of running on the server, which results in a monthly or yearly charge that's less than the relatively high price tag of dedicated hosting.

Virtual Private Server(VPS) is popular because of the advanced requirements from medium to large websites. If you have a website which is becoming more and more popular and requires more server and bandwidth resources, you may want to upgrade from a shared hosting to VPS hosting. See more details about VPS hosting features & FAQs. Here we will compare two of the most popular VPS hosting services and types – Managed VPS and Unmanaged VPS.


The number of sites that you host on the server, the number of databases or mailboxes are not limited on a VPS, moreover, Hostens does not block any ports. VPS is a separate server that gives its owner the possibility to customize its settings. On shared hosting, you cannot choose any control panel or any software, as the provider has already configured it. As VPS provides full access (SSH) to VPS hosting, the customer is free to install, manage and control any software that is compatible with server virtualization.


Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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