Users are guaranteed the resources on their VPS web hosting account. This means that your account will always be allocated the set amount of RAM, CPU, and Disk Space you’ve chosen regardless of what other users on the server are doing. This allows for greater stability and performance of your website. You also do not share the Operating System with any other users, providing better security for your website files.
The web and server hosting world is full of abbreviations that look as though they were designed to confuse inexperienced hosting clients: IaaS, PaaS, SSD, SSL, VPN, VPS, and many more. It’s especially confusing when abbreviations are similar, but mean completely different things, as is the case with VPN and VPS. I’ve often heard hosting clients say VPN when they mean VPS, and vice versa.

The primary disadvantage to using a VPS is its lack of performance. The organization that provides the VPS will typically throttle the server's performance in an effort to maximize the number of VPSs that the physical server is able to accommodate. In the unlikely event that the VPS's performance is not throttled, it then becomes possible for an adjacent VPS to consume excessive resources, to the point of impacting the VPS's performance.
A Cloud VPS is an emulation of a computer, also known as a virtual private server, that lives within a parent server and shares resources with other virtual servers. A Dedicated Server is a stand-alone, physical server that does not share resources. As with fixed resources, scarcity can lead to less than optimal performance for the resource-intensive application, which is why Dedicated Servers often outperform VPS instances.
Amazon VPC provides advanced security features, such as security groups and network access control lists, to enable inbound and outbound filtering at the instance level and subnet level. In addition, you can store data in Amazon S3 and restrict access so that it’s only accessible from instances in your VPC. Optionally, you can also choose to launch Dedicated Instances which run on hardware dedicated to a single customer for additional isolation.
Typical Use Case: Early stage startup workloads, quick prototypes, prelaunch experimentations, dev/test environments, microservices node, code repositories, dedicated application servers for light workloads. Resource intensive workloads like data aggregation, gaming front-ends, video encoding, high performance computing, batch processing. Also see our managed services for Startupreneurs.
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