If you'd like to run a VPS, I'd suggest you to look for a managed one with cPanel. cPanel is a piece of software that facilitates a lot configuring the server, while managed means that the support guys will help you with initial configuration of the server, and also help you out with config/upgrades whenever you need help. It's a bit more expensive than non-managed, but if you don't know how to manage/administer a server, than it's essential. You can find a decent managed VPS in USA from 20 $ and up.
Hey there, apologies for the delay in responding! Thank you for your interest in considering your web hosting options. We do have a reseller hosting option. To answer your question between shared and VPS hosting, I would recommend VPS hosting. This would allow each of your clients to have their own cPanel, whereas a shared account would only include one cPanel account. I recommend contacting our Sales Team via live chat for the most recent/up to date "rates". There are multiple options that you can consider; the prices are also available on our VPS hosting page. I hope this helps!
A virtual server and a dedicated server differ by the number of users that possess resources on a physical server. With a virtual private server, some of the resources are isolated for individual users, but there are multiple users on the same physical server. With a dedicated server, a single user has access to all of the resources of a physical server.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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