Change is a good thing. Unfortunately, when you are making big changes to your site or application, there is always room for error. Live-state snapshots takes the idea of a "backup" and brings it forward to its next logical step. Taking a snapshot of your partition not only creates a backup of your files, but also all of the processes running in the background at that instant in time. This way, if you make an error or break something while making updates, you can revert your partition to that exact snapshot, providing a working, fail-safe rollback.
Alrighty than, wait to see if they'll be adding support for smartnofes. In case they don't have plans to include SMART soon, than since you're good with computers I suggest you rent a managed VPS and just dive in it. Once you get the hang of it, it's not hard. But if you will use it only for your smartnofe, than turn off any other service to minimize the attack surface (like apache, mail and other servers you won't need).
Today's broadband connections demand faster and more reliable performance from your web site and email. With an InMotion Hosting VPS account you'll have access to the fastest Gigabit network available. Our network was specifically built to be expandable for capacity and for throughput. Our all Gigabit server farm is connected to the Internet through 3 separate providers with an on demand capacity exceeding 7,500 MBits. We utilize BGP4 Smart Routing and can switch instantly and transparently away from any of our providers that are experiencing latency or downtime. Our advanced knowledge and planning allow us to provide extremely fast and reliable service while still offering affordable hosting on our virtual private servers.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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