To break things down a bit, cloud VPS (Virtual Private Server) hosting is when a web hosting provider takes one massive server and partitions it up so that it can have several servers on it, each of which can run its own operating system and can be re-booted independently.  Sounds simple enough.  So what is the difference between managed VPS and unmanaged VPS?
InMotion Hosting’s Virtual Private Server Hosting comes with a number of additional features including high-availability, Live-State and Scheduled snapshots, resource monitoring, free solid-state drives (SSDs), a free full cPanel license, 2-3 free dedicated IP addresses, WHM, CentOS, burstable RAM, automated data backups, unlimited MySQL databases, email accounts and FTP accounts, root access and SSH access.

Managed VPS hosting is the ideal solution for both non-technical but also technically savvy people since the hosting provider takes care of any technical tasks related to the server. In other words the web hosting provider is responsible for managing the server including system upgrades and configuration and your job is to do what you are supposed to do i.e. run your website or online business.
Similarly, in the case of VPS, there are several users that are using the same server but they are isolated from each other. It means that no one will be affected by how much resources another is using. You will get the speed and security that you need without compromise. It is almost a perfect scenario because you will get the benefits of a private server with shared cost of services.

Our 24/7/365 Guru Crew Support team often is asked "What happens if I outgrow my A2 Hosting Shared Web Hosting account?". Their concern stems from possibly having to leave a hosting provider they have grown to appreciate only to have find another provider that could very well offer sub par service. This question is asked by new customers and customers who have been hosting with us for years alike.


A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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