Way of using resources In the case of shared hosting, websites and / or applications residing on the server make use of resources and available server capacity at the same time. In the case of VPS hosting, each websites and / or applications residing on the server is being allotted a virtually distinct server.  Here a separate, exclusive server is often rented.
It’s easy to deploy Microsoft enterprise applications on virtual machines. From Microsoft SharePoint and Dynamics, to SQL Server, Machine Learning Server, and System Center—you get great stability, performance, and guidance when running on Azure. Our world-class support team has you covered, and our flexible technical support plans cover everything from Microsoft applications to cloud infrastructure.
VPS is short for a Virtual Private Server, which refers to the partitioning of a physical server into multiple servers. You can think of a VPS like a Dedicated Server, where you can enjoy all the components a Dedicated Server offers yet you pay a lower price. Each VPS also features its own OS (Operating System) and allows for separate rebooting. Since each OS receives a specific share of the resources from the physical server, each one is isolated from one another and cannot interfere.
A key aspect of VPS internet hosting is its virtualization capabilities. With VPS, the hosting provider divides each physical server into multiple smaller virtual servers with private and dedicated RAM and hard drive space. This provides site owners with a more isolated hosting environment without disruptions from other clients sharing server space.
KnownHost has a blog, wiki and forums which have fresh topics that are interesting and relevant, plus informative answers to thousands of common questions. You can also give our server admin, support team and sales staff a shout anytime you have questions or concerns and we'll be happy to answer your questions, recommend VPS (or other) solutions and help you make the most out of your VPS hosting plan(s).

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For plans or packages featuring unlimited websites, domains, or email accounts, we do not enforce any official limitations. Customers are able to utilize as many of these features as they wish. That said, these are of course not infinite resources and there are inherent maximums associated with the technology powering them. For example, while email account creation is unlimited, these rely on the file storage available on the account. Therefore customers need to be operating within the Terms of Service to ensure resources are available to fully enable email functionality. Customers operating within the Terms of Service have yet to come up against technical boundaries for email, domains, or websites.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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