VPS can be a perfect solution for businesses that want many of the features of a dedicated server but don't have the resources to physically host, support and maintain the server hardware. A shared environment won't offer you the same bandwidth or Web hosting space that a VPS will be able to support and there are also many more constraints on the software you can run in a shared hosting environment. In contrast, a VPS will give you the freedom to install, delete, reboot and do all the functions as if you have your own server. You also get an increased level of security as each VPS is isolated and completely separate from other Virtual Private Servers on the same physical server. The environment is secure and protected and each VPS can be rebooted or stopped independently – even if a hacker infiltrates one VPS there is no access to the others using the same physical server.
However, with InMotion you get enterprise-level servers and a 90-day money-back guarantee: so you have 3 full months to see if this company is right for you! Is it? We believe so - it's one of the highest ranked VPS services we tested. Unlocked CPU cores allow for faster data processing, and with plenty of resources, you can host not one, but several big projects under one account. If you're not sure whether the VPS can handle what you throw at it, give InMotion a try. It most definitely can.
A VPS hosting provider relies on virtualization software, called a hypervisor, to abstract resources on a physical server and provide customers with access to an emulated server, called a virtual machine (VM). Each virtual machine runs a complete operating system, and has restricted access to a portion of the physical server's compute, memory and storage resources. Customers have access to the VM's OS, but not to the physical server.
Both single-machine and cloud-based VPSes are managed using a software program called a hypervisor. The machine that runs the hypervisor is called the host machine and the individual virtual private servers are called guest machines or guest instances. The hypervisor can start and stop the virtual machines and allocates system resources, such as CPU, memory, and disk storage to each VPS.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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