Virtual servers are scalable and come with dedicated core and memory allocations. They are a great option if you are looking for compute resources, that can be added in minutes, with access to features like image templates. The hypervisor is fully managed by IBM Cloud, and you can perform configuration and management tasks by using both the IBM Cloud customer portal and the API. Virtual servers are deployed to the same VLANs as physical servers, allowing you to spread workloads across virtual servers and bare metal servers while maintaining interoperability. Virtual servers are fully customizable when you 
order them, with options to scale up as your compute needs grow.


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While Dedicated Server Hosting offers isolated hardware, where resources such as disk input/output and host network connections are not shared, it also requires a significant upfront investment and a higher level of technical capability to manage it. With VPS Hosting, you share a server with other customers, but remain isolated from those other users on the server. With Virtual Private Server Hosting you are granted your own section of a partitioned dedicated server with a guaranteed threshold of dedicated RAM, storage and bandwidth and have the ability to customize this partition, much like a dedicated server. VPS Hosting provides a more cost-effective and scalable option for growing businesses when compared to Dedicated Server Hosting. On the other hand, with Shared Hosting you share a portion of the server with other users, potentially affecting your output if other users on the same server are experiencing high traffic.


Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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