Another benefit of virtualizing servers is that they are no longer tied to a hardware platform. This provides the ability to virtually expand or upgrade (upgrade) the hardware platform during operation without significant downtime (~ 1 second downtime). Also, a hardware problem does not result in longer downtime (assuming existing spare capacity) because the VPS can be restarted quickly on a different hardware.
With the launch of InMotion Hosting’s new Self-Managed (Unmanaged) VPS product, SysAdmins and experienced developers have expressed a lot of enthusiasm for this new solution. But, the distinction has left others wondering which product would best serve their needs. One of the most common questions we have received has been “What is the difference between a managed and an unmanaged VPS, and which one should I choose?”
Amazon VPC provides advanced security features, such as security groups and network access control lists, to enable inbound and outbound filtering at the instance level and subnet level. In addition, you can store data in Amazon S3 and restrict access so that it’s only accessible from instances in your VPC. Optionally, you can also choose to launch Dedicated Instances which run on hardware dedicated to a single customer for additional isolation.

The force driving server virtualization is similar to that which led to the development of time-sharing and multiprogramming in the past. Although the resources are still shared, as under the time-sharing model, virtualization provides a higher level of security, dependent on the type of virtualization used, as the individual virtual servers are mostly isolated from each other and may run their own full-fledged operating system which can be independently rebooted as a virtual instance.
×