The most obvious and popular reason for a VPS is to run a single website, or multiple websites. However, you can use them for pretty much anything that requires access to the internet – such as a web application like Nextcloud to run your own Dropbox alternative – or to create your own virtual private network to better secure the internet connection of your PCs and mobile devices.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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Shared hosting is like you are living in a room with a lot of friends. It means you must fit in the same room and you must split the cost of several things because it is affordable and cheap. However, several individuals are sharing the same space, it means everyone needs to live within a space with restricted resources among them. You will have to use the same things (that sounds a little unhygienic).
Max Ostryzhko:
There are a few downsides to shared hosting, though, mostly because you’re sharing. For instance, if someone else on your shared server has a huge spike in traffic, that could affect your website’s performance. However, if you’re just getting your website off the ground and don’t have huge traffic volume, shared hosting is a great way to get online!

Shared: To begin with, both VPS and Shared Hosting host multiple tenants on a single server. However, there is one key difference: In Shared Hosting, the resources are spread equally between all users. As a result, the bandwidth for users of Shared Hosting will fluctuate based on need and you won’t be able to control the bandwidth you receive. On the other hand, VPS is a more customised option – you can select a plan and provider that gives you access to the maximum amount of RAM, server space and bandwidth. From the first step, VPS puts the reins in your hands.
Hostinger provides a 6-tier plan for their VPS hosting services, which you can choose to fit the needs of your website. Their Plan 1 offers the basic specs with 1,000 GB (aka 1TB) of bandwidth, 20 GB of disk space, and about 1 GB of RAMs. If you want more, you can opt for Plan 6 which gives you a whopping 8 GB of RAM, 160 GB of disk space and 6,000 GB of bandwidth.
Eliran Ouzan:
The most obvious and popular reason for a VPS is to run a single website, or multiple websites. However, you can use them for pretty much anything that requires access to the internet – such as a web application like Nextcloud to run your own Dropbox alternative – or to create your own virtual private network to better secure the internet connection of your PCs and mobile devices.
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