Technical knowledge: No technical knowledge is required for running a managed server. When you need to do something technical all you have to do is contact support and let the skilled technical support operators handle the rest. With an unmanaged server you need to have server administration skills and love working in the command line otherwise it will be very difficult to administer your server efficiently.
Do you plan to sell products or services? If so, you'll want to invest in a web hosting service that offers Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). An SSL connection encrypts the financial information that shuttles between users' web browsers and your website, thus safeguarding the transmission of the purchasing information. Some hosting companies include a free SSL certificate when you sign up for a web hosting plan, while others charge close to $100. You can save some money by shopping around for services that offer the cheaper SSL plans.

Because you only are using a portion of the resources for the VM, you can have several of them running on one computer or server, as is common with hosting services. A hosting provider that offers VPS hosting has a vast number of physical servers that each contain multiple virtual machines. While demarcation and intrusion prevention within the physical machine is not a huge concern on your own PC, VPS hosts must have security safeguards in place to ensure isolation of each customer’s server. That’s why the terminology virtual private server is used – to denote the attention paid to privacy and the server programs that are typically loaded onto this type of VM.


Need more resources than a Web Hosting account, but aren’t quite ready for a Dedicated Server? Our high performance Managed VPS Hosting is the perfect solution. Experience the power and isolation of a VPS expertly combined with the easy-to-use cPanel control panel. Choose our Turbo Boost VPS featuring up to 20X faster page loads than competing hosts.
The primary disadvantage to using a VPS is its lack of performance. The organization that provides the VPS will typically throttle the server's performance in an effort to maximize the number of VPSs that the physical server is able to accommodate. In the unlikely event that the VPS's performance is not throttled, it then becomes possible for an adjacent VPS to consume excessive resources, to the point of impacting the VPS's performance.
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
×