In terms of backups, databases and files, it all depends on the type of setup you choose. If you choose a server with a control panel it will make it effortless but if you want to do it manually, i suggest you take some time to learn how to do it properly, because, one error and you might loose everything you have worked for. My suggestion for a best server setup is a cloud managed cPanel VPS with SSD and good backup tool.
It’s recommended that you do not statically assign the private IP assigned to the Azure virtual machine within the operating system of a VM, unless necessary, such as when assigning multiple IP addresses to a Windows VM. If you do manually set the private IP address within the operating system, ensure that it is the same address as the private IP address assigned to the Azure network interface, or you can lose connectivity to the virtual machine. Learn more about private IP address settings. You should never manually assign the public IP address assigned to an Azure virtual machine within the virtual machine's operating system.

So that could be either a virtual machine - an operating system running inside another operating system, or a virtual private server - you rent a virtual server from a company, so you have your own internet-facing server running 24/7 relatively cheap (since it's not a real server, but one of many virtual server running on an actual server). I think he might have meant the later, since you'd have to run a snartnofe (btw I love that name) non stop to benefit from it.


A virtual machine (VM) is automatically assigned a private IP address from a range that you specify, based on the subnet it is deployed in. The address is retained by a VM until the VM is deleted. Azure dynamically assigns the next available private IP address from the subnet you create a VM in. Assign a static IP address if you want a specific IP address from the subnet assigned to the VM.
During the Nutanix demo, Andy did what he does better than anyone I know – he drew a full stack of Nutanix on the whiteboard and covered the hyperconverged technology from end to end. I was intrigued by Andy’s presentation of hyperconvergence. For more information see the results of Gartner’s Peer Insights: Nutanix vs VMware Review. Some folks say Nutanix is the solution to the VMware tax.

Virtual private server (VPS) hosting is a type of web hosting that uses software to emulate multiple servers on a single virtual host. Even though the websites are hosted on the same physical machine, VPS hosting allows each server to be entirely independent, treating them as if each site were on its own separate machine. One advantage of VPS is that it fits in well with other hosting plans. A virtual hosting plan gives clients another hosting option that fits between most shared hosting and dedicated hosting pans.
Think of it like buying a pre-built computer versus building your own computer. When you buy a pre-built computer, it comes with everything already decided for you. You bring it home, plug it in, and turn it on and all the software has already been installed. On the other hand, when you build your own system you get to choose each piece of hardware, put it together, select your operating system, and install your own software. Building your own system takes more work, and you cannot simply turn it on and begin using it. But, in exchange for this additional effort, you get self-determination and control over your hardware and software. You can choose your favorite operating system and the apps you want to install, no longer beholden to the manufacturer’s one-size-fits-all selections. Similarly, with a Self-Managed VPS, you have to do some initial set-up and later management. Yet, you get to choose the software configuration you want to perfectly suit your operating specifications.
VPS hosting, on the other hand, provides you with dedicated resources that you don’t need to share. Every virtual private server hosting plan makes sure that you get the highest control of your resources. Control your CPUs, Burst RAM, manage root access and use your preferred OS. The downside of VPS hosting is that, while we cover the back-end and server monitoring, maintaining it 24/7, we can provide limited help to your project concerning customer support. While all VPS hosting and control panel questions we will help with, programming, coding and other queries of similar nature won't be covered.

I have some sites hosted on a shared-hosting/cpanel environment and need to make a move up. I have some experience running my own server, but it is very basic (a local box to do live testing/file serv). My question is how difficult is it to run a VPS, should I buy a managed VPS (with stuff already installed), or unmanaged (blank box), and lastly if I go for unmanaged what steps should I take to keep my VPS secure? Edit: Also how difficult is it to backup files and databases? Can it be automated?
A couple of years ago I remembered going to a demo and watching Hyper-V crash, but since then a lot has changed. Hyper-V can now do many of the same things most enterprise virtualization software boast about. Live migration, HA, templates, and importing VMs from VMware and EC2 using SystemCenter VMM. The only real hang up is the lack of popularity with the Linux community

A couple of years ago I remembered going to a demo and watching Hyper-V crash, but since then a lot has changed. Hyper-V can now do many of the same things most enterprise virtualization software boast about. Live migration, HA, templates, and importing VMs from VMware and EC2 using SystemCenter VMM. The only real hang up is the lack of popularity with the Linux community


Amazon EC2 is a web service that provides secure, resizable compute capacity in the cloud. It is designed to make web-scale cloud computing easier for developers. You can use Amazon EC2 for a variety of applications, including websites and web applications, development and test environments, and even back-up and recovery scenarios. Amazon EC2 offers a wide selection of instance types with varying combinations of CPU, memory, storage, and networking capacity that you can use to meet the unique needs of your applications.

Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]

×