If you host it in a VPS environment, your site won't share resources with neighboring sites, the way it would with shared hosting. In fact, your site lives in a partitioned server area that has its own operating system, storage, RAM, and monthly data transfer limits, so you can expect smoother, more stable site performance. The sites with which you share your server are far less likely to affect your site—or even take it down altogether—than they would be on a shared site. Knowing how VPS setups operate is just the first step, however. You still need to familiarize yourself with the essential features needed for building a rock-solid, VPS-hosted website.
Perhaps the best way to approach the virtual server is the idea of a virtual machine. A VM allows you to run an emulation of a computer within your computer, drawing on the resources of the physical one –  disk space, RAM, CPU, etc. This tactic allows you to run an entirely separate operating system (OS) solely for the purposes of the VM, even if its type and version of OS are identical to what’s on your hardware.
Users of Shared hosting all share the resources on the server their websites are on. There is no guarantee of RAM or CPU with Shared hosting. Shared hosting also does not provide full root access to the server, as opposed to VPS package where users are given full root access to perform commands and make configuration changes to their hosting environment.
VPS can be a perfect solution for businesses that want many of the features of a dedicated server but don't have the resources to physically host, support and maintain the server hardware. A shared environment won't offer you the same bandwidth or Web hosting space that a VPS will be able to support and there are also many more constraints on the software you can run in a shared hosting environment. In contrast, a VPS will give you the freedom to install, delete, reboot and do all the functions as if you have your own server. You also get an increased level of security as each VPS is isolated and completely separate from other Virtual Private Servers on the same physical server. The environment is secure and protected and each VPS can be rebooted or stopped independently – even if a hacker infiltrates one VPS there is no access to the others using the same physical server.
You can host a basic web application, such as a blog or simple website in a VPC, and gain the additional layers of privacy and security afforded by Amazon VPC. You can help secure the website by creating security group rules which allow the webserver to respond to inbound HTTP and SSL requests from the Internet while simultaneously prohibiting the webserver from initiating outbound connections to the Internet. You can create a VPC that supports this use case by selecting "VPC with a Single Public Subnet Only" from the Amazon VPC console wizard.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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