Typically, a web hosting service gives you the option of selecting either a traditional hard drive or a solid-state drive as your website's storage medium. Traditional hard drives have large capacities and lower prices, but they aren't quite as resilient as their SSD counterparts. Solid-state drives, on the other hand, are often faster and more reliable than HDDs, but they cost more and have smaller storage capacities. Unless you truly need blazing speed, a traditional hard drive should get the job done.

You may also think that since you've customized your VPS, that you're stuck with the resources that you originally selected when you created your account. That's not true either. If you need additional resources after signing up for your account, that's just a sign that your site is growing. It's a sign of success. You shouldn't be penalized because for this success. That's why our VPS plans are completely scalable. Just contact our support team when you need more resources and we'll be happy to help.
Because Cloud VPS is an unmanaged VPS, it requires your own maintenance and setup. We highly suggest this product to those already comfortable with Linux and the command line. Not sure if this is what you need or worried about missing a control panel? Start a conversation with one of our Linux hosting experts and they'll point you in the right direction.

Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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