You can easily customize the network configuration for your Amazon VPC. For example, you can create a public-facing subnet for your web servers that has access to the Internet, and place your backend systems such as databases or application servers in a private-facing subnet with no Internet access. You can leverage multiple layers of security, including security groups and network access control lists, to help control access to Amazon EC2 instances in each subnet.
Mirror and share a deep copy of your in and outbound virtual network traffic. Take advantage of aggregation, packet collection and load balancing solutions by streaming traffic to a destination IP endpoint or an internal load balancer in the same Virtual Network, peered Virtual Network or Network Virtual Appliance that you can deploy from a growing list of Security, Network and Application performance management partners.
A VPS is not the same as a dedicated server, but it gives the illusion of being one. A good Web developer can do almost anything on a VPS that they would want to do on dedicated server, however, a VPS hosting plan is substantially less expensive, comes with technical support, and the hardware behind a VPS is not your responsibility. Sure, cheap servers can be acquired, but they will require a far larger overhead in terms of physical security and technical maintenance, security and support. Ultimately, a VPS can be the perfect solution when you need more flexibility and features than a shared hosting plan, but are not in the market for your own dedicated hosting server.
You're an experienced developer who wants full control over your environment. We're giving it to you! You get root access so you're able to access and edit all of your server's files! You get to choose your Linux OS and can even re-load your server with a new operating system on demand! You also get boot, shutdown and reboot control. Now we're talking about serious hosting!

A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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