Sometimes you need more power than an entry-level web hosting service can provide. If you're looking to take your business online and want to build your website on a server that offers more power, stability, and flexibility than shared hosting, but you don't want to pay the higher cost of dedicated hosting, VPS, or virtual private server hosting, may be the perfect middle-of-the-road service tier for your business.
With our dedicated servers, you rent an entire server. This is optimal for people that have very high traffic to their websites or need to setup their server in a very specific way. Not everyone needs to have a fully dedicated web server however. If you're just getting started with your website, you can save quite a bit of money if you rent a small portion of the server. Shared hosting is when you share a portion of the server with other users rather than rent an entire server to yourself.
A VPS hosting provider relies on virtualization software, called a hypervisor, to abstract resources on a physical server and provide customers with access to an emulated server, called a virtual machine (VM). Each virtual machine runs a complete operating system, and has restricted access to a portion of the physical server's compute, memory and storage resources. Customers have access to the VM's OS, but not to the physical server.
For plans or packages featuring unlimited websites, domains, or email accounts, we do not enforce any official limitations. Customers are able to utilize as many of these features as they wish. That said, these are of course not infinite resources and there are inherent maximums associated with the technology powering them. For example, while email account creation is unlimited, these rely on the file storage available on the account. Therefore customers need to be operating within the Terms of Service to ensure resources are available to fully enable email functionality. Customers operating within the Terms of Service have yet to come up against technical boundaries for email, domains, or websites.
If you are not already familiar with Linux system administration, you will need to devote a great deal of time to familiarizing yourself with all of the applications you're using and the CentOS operating system - you could pay someone else to set up your VPS for you, but that wouldn't help down the road when you need to update software and resolve administrative issues... (if you're not sure, go with a managed service)
Managed VPS plans offer a managed environment similar to our shared hosting accounts, but with increased resource availability. If you are outgrowing a shared hosting environment, but are not ready yet to make the leap to a dedicated server, you should consider a managed VPS. This plan is also a good option if you need certain customizations that are not provided with shared hosting plans, but you would still like A2 Hosting to handle configuration changes, software upgrades, and other system administration tasks.
Today's broadband connections demand faster and more reliable performance from your web site and email. With an InMotion Hosting VPS account you'll have access to the fastest Gigabit network available. Our network was specifically built to be expandable for capacity and for throughput. Our all Gigabit server farm is connected to the Internet through 3 separate providers with an on demand capacity exceeding 7,500 MBits. We utilize BGP4 Smart Routing and can switch instantly and transparently away from any of our providers that are experiencing latency or downtime. Our advanced knowledge and planning allow us to provide extremely fast and reliable service while still offering affordable hosting on our virtual private servers.
Cloud hosting: This type of hosting is slightly more expensive than shared hosting (similarly priced to VPS hosting). Rather than using a single server to store and load your site, a cloud system distributes resources across many different computers for faster response times. However, this model typically doesn’t give you root access, and its distributed structure presents fundamental security challenges.
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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