Another way you can customize your VPS to your specific needs is with your choice of Linux operating systems. Select from the best versions of Ubuntu, CentOS, Fedora, Debian, Gentoo or Slackware. If you're in the middle of a project and want change to a different version or a different OS entirely, you can change and re-load your operating system on demand whenever you want!
Increase your redundancy with VPS snapshots. We now offer two kinds of VPS snapshots: Live-State and Scheduled. While both are used to create full container backup of your Virtual Private Server as a failsafe to roll back to in case of any issues, Live-State Snapshots are meant as an on-demand feature while Scheduled Snapshots can create a snapshot up to once a day! Whether it's an operating system or programming language update/upgrade, or for something as simple as a single website edit, our snapshot features enable you to go back in time and revert your container to the exact state it was in when you took the snapshot, including technology versions, content and even live processes.

Another benefit of virtualizing servers is that they are no longer tied to a hardware platform. This provides the ability to virtually expand or upgrade (upgrade) the hardware platform during operation without significant downtime (~ 1 second downtime). Also, a hardware problem does not result in longer downtime (assuming existing spare capacity) because the VPS can be restarted quickly on a different hardware.
Alrighty than, wait to see if they'll be adding support for smartnofes. In case they don't have plans to include SMART soon, than since you're good with computers I suggest you rent a managed VPS and just dive in it. Once you get the hang of it, it's not hard. But if you will use it only for your smartnofe, than turn off any other service to minimize the attack surface (like apache, mail and other servers you won't need).
A VPS hosting provider relies on virtualization software, called a hypervisor, to abstract resources on a physical server and provide customers with access to an emulated server, called a virtual machine (VM). Each virtual machine runs a complete operating system, and has restricted access to a portion of the physical server's compute, memory and storage resources. Customers have access to the VM's OS, but not to the physical server.

As you can see, each of these options has its own advantages, so you will need to weigh the options and determine which one will best meet your site’s needs. Depending on the amount of traffic your site receives, the resources needed to maintain the best performance for your site’s users, or any other specifications that you might need to consider (such as high availability, disaster recovery, or load balancing), either option might be best for you. If you need help determining the ideal solution for your website, please contact us to speak to a hosting expert.
Since the 90’s VMware has been evolving. It started as a clumsy little software that used to be installed on a Windows desktop. Then from there, it changed into GSX for Windows Servers. And then again it morphed into ESX which eliminated the need for Windows and booted to a Redhat kernel. And later in version 4, it became ESXi which now runs on a custom Linux kernel.
Use Virtual Network to build your services that rely on Azure cloud services and Azure Virtual Machines. Use Azure web roles for your front end and virtual machines for backend databases. Combine platform as a service (PaaS) and infrastructure as a service (IaaS) in a virtual network to get more flexibility and scalability when you’re building apps.
With many other VPS plans, they cut off and limit your resource usage. Our Cloud VPS plans are different in the sense that they offer Burstable RAM limits. You will have a dedicated amount of RAM during low traffic periods (1.5GB for Cloud VPS-1000, 3GB for Cloud VPS-2000 and 6GB for Cloud VPS-3000), but are able to use a higher amount during high traffic surges and spikes.
I have some sites hosted on a shared-hosting/cpanel environment and need to make a move up. I have some experience running my own server, but it is very basic (a local box to do live testing/file serv). My question is how difficult is it to run a VPS, should I buy a managed VPS (with stuff already installed), or unmanaged (blank box), and lastly if I go for unmanaged what steps should I take to keep my VPS secure? Edit: Also how difficult is it to backup files and databases? Can it be automated?
Managed VPS provides an excellent solution for most users who would prefer to have an expert manage their server while the customer focuses more exclusively on their business, their websites, and their clients. Not everyone who uses a Managed VPS lacks technical savvy; far from it! Some prefer this solution because it requires less effort to set-up, requires less monitoring, and tends to “just work” with little or no effort.

You can choose to create additional VPCs by going to the Amazon VPC page on the AWS Management Console and selecting the "Start VPC Wizard" button. You’ll be presented with four basic network topologies. Select the one that most closely resembles the network topology that you’d like to create and choose the "Create VPC" button. Once the VPC has been created, you can begin launching Amazon EC2 instances into your VPC.
Amazon VPC provides advanced security features, such as security groups and network access control lists, to enable inbound and outbound filtering at the instance level and subnet level. In addition, you can store data in Amazon S3 and restrict access so that it’s only accessible from instances in your VPC. Optionally, you can also choose to launch Dedicated Instances which run on hardware dedicated to a single customer for additional isolation.
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