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postscreen_dnsbl_sites = zen.spamhaus.org  bl.spamcop.net b.barracudacentral.org
The most obvious and popular reason for a VPS is to run a single website, or multiple websites. However, you can use them for pretty much anything that requires access to the internet – such as a web application like Nextcloud to run your own Dropbox alternative – or to create your own virtual private network to better secure the internet connection of your PCs and mobile devices.
Some virtualization platforms, primarily "bare metal" hypervisors, do not permit the realtime allocation or alteration of system resources to VPS partitions. Managed VPS plans including cPanel offer the AWStats service for viewing metered bandwidth on web traffic by month & day. Google Webmaster Tools is another good resource for monitoring and calculating the average traffic usage for a website by geo-location, time of day, weekend use, holiday rates, etc.
Every plan has some appealing configuration options. In particular, along with support for the usual Linux variants – CentOS, Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian – you can choose Windows Server 2008, 2012 or 2016 for only a $5 a month premium. That's very good value, and if you're more familiar with Windows than Linux, it could save you from lots of management hassles later on.
Most SSD storage drives operate in RAID arrays in data centers including multiple copies of website files for backup purposes in case of hardware failure. SSD storage can also be used as Virtual RAM (VRAM) with much higher performance standards than HDD for caching PHP & MySQL database functions in active memory. Effective use of SSD & VRAM in web servers can save significantly money in corporate IT and has been developed by Twitter in their data centers. Generally, it would not be recommended to sign up for VPS plans implementing HDD storage over SSD options in 2017 for hosting.

# A non-persistent memcache: temporary whitelist can be shared between postscreen(8) daemons
Let’s break hosting types down using a simple analogy. Shared hosting is like living in an apartment; it’s cheap and can come furnished with everything you need to move in. The tradeoff is sharing facilities with many other people (sharing resources with the other accounts on the same server), and if you throw a massive party (have lots of traffic), building management will want to talk to you.
Shared hosting usually works for small to medium web sites.  A shared host may be less costly, but it does not allow total control over the hosting environment.  A shared host does not permit the use of different operating systems or the installation of custom software.  It may be true many web site owners are not interested in the administration of a server and prefer leaving it to their host.  However, it is ideal if a web site owner desires more control and needs new software that is not available in a shared web hosting environment.  When looking for VPS hosting, one should look at the resources needed, the upgrade process, the application requirements and the number of accounts needed on each server to determine the appropriate amount of resources for a VPS.  The cost should be reasonable for what is offered.
Hostinger provides a 6-tier plan for their VPS hosting services, which you can choose to fit the needs of your website. Their Plan 1 offers the basic specs with 1,000 GB (aka 1TB) of bandwidth, 20 GB of disk space, and about 1 GB of RAMs. If you want more, you can opt for Plan 6 which gives you a whopping 8 GB of RAM, 160 GB of disk space and 6,000 GB of bandwidth.
Shared hosting is not meant for websites that use large amounts of RAM. As your website grows and you add more and more content, you will start to see a decrease in your website’s load times. As soon as this happens, it’s an indication that you are maxing out your limits. Upgrading to a VPS will enable you to scale your website without having to worry about slow load times.
The most obvious and popular reason for a VPS is to run a single website, or multiple websites. However, you can use them for pretty much anything that requires access to the internet – such as a web application like Nextcloud to run your own Dropbox alternative – or to create your own virtual private network to better secure the internet connection of your PCs and mobile devices.
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