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Liquid Web claims to have the fastest managed VPS hosting on the planet. That might be true. Their VPS hosting plans are a little bit more expensive than you will find with other hosts. However, their base plan comes with 2 vCPUs, 40GB SSD disk space, 10TB of bandwidth, and the choice of cPanel or Plesk Onyx. Their base plan is only for Linux-based hosting as well.


The current trend in Linux web server OS distributions is for extremely lightweight installation requirements and integration with containers for elastic scaling of big data applications. Rancher and CoreOS both work with Docker and Kubernetes as well as other cloud orchestration platforms like OpenStack, CloudStack, CloudFoundry, OpenShift, Mesosphere, etc. Lightweight OS installations increase the number of virtual machines that can be created on data center hardware, leading to greater efficiency in production environments.


Each of these stack layers contain I/O routes for anonymous public network requests that must be penetration-tested by web security professionals. Users on managed plans can expect the hosting company to keep all of the web server stack software updated with security patches, while website owners under unmanaged plans will need to keep these aspects up-to-date personally.
While there are more affordable VPS services out there, A2 is a worthy consideration because of its excellent support. It is a company that takes a remarkable care of non-clients goes to great extents for its trusted users. Its VPS solutions tick all boxes by offering root access, fully managed, and full unmanaged virtual servers for businesses of any size and technical acumen.
Hostinger provides a 6-tier plan for their VPS hosting services, which you can choose to fit the needs of your website. Their Plan 1 offers the basic specs with 1,000 GB (aka 1TB) of bandwidth, 20 GB of disk space, and about 1 GB of RAMs. If you want more, you can opt for Plan 6 which gives you a whopping 8 GB of RAM, 160 GB of disk space and 6,000 GB of bandwidth.

Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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When you create a website, you have to pay a company to host it on their server. This is a powerful computer that allows anyone on the internet to connect and access your site. The lowest level of server is a shared hosting plan where hundreds of websites (and all their data) are stored on one server with all of the server’s resources up for grabs depending on who needs them.

The most obvious and popular reason for a VPS is to run a single website, or multiple websites. However, you can use them for pretty much anything that requires access to the internet – such as a web application like Nextcloud to run your own Dropbox alternative – or to create your own virtual private network to better secure the internet connection of your PCs and mobile devices.
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