Buying a VPS plan means that you get your very own virtual server environment. You have full control over the operating system, the extensions and apps you install, and all their settings. Each physical server will still host multiple VPS customers, but not as many as with shared hosting, and typically each VPS will be allocated a share of key resources – RAM, storage space, CPU cores – for their use alone.

Essentially, here’s the criteria I would use to judge things – if your site is made up of primarily static, HTML-based content, then you probably don’t need a VPS package.  However, if you have a large amount of files stored, multiple sites, dynamic content, and the possibility of major traffic from time to time, then you might consider upgrading to a VPS. It’s a powerful package that allows you to do more than you could with a shared hosting plan, but requires less investment than a dedicated server.


While there are more affordable VPS services out there, A2 is a worthy consideration because of its excellent support. It is a company that takes a remarkable care of non-clients goes to great extents for its trusted users. Its VPS solutions tick all boxes by offering root access, fully managed, and full unmanaged virtual servers for businesses of any size and technical acumen.
What are the advantages of VPS?

Whatever your VPS hosting needs, you can create a configuration for it at InterServer. InterServer is one of the few hosting companies that offer both Linux (multiple flavors) and Windows VPS servers. They also offer the option of several different virtualization platforms such as OpenVZ, KVM, or cloud. Depending on your configuration, you can choose between a fully managed and a full control (for you) server.


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The most obvious and popular reason for a VPS is to run a single website, or multiple websites. However, you can use them for pretty much anything that requires access to the internet – such as a web application like Nextcloud to run your own Dropbox alternative – or to create your own virtual private network to better secure the internet connection of your PCs and mobile devices.
Do you remember those times when you were living on a college campus with very noisy roommates? Or maybe they were super quiet and you enjoyed every day? The point is, it was a gamble - you never knew whom you ended up with. This is pretty much the same as having shared hosting account - you haven’t the faintest idea who is your roommate on a server. The analogy may sound funny but if someone on a shared server becomes a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack target or get blocked for mass mailing, other accounts on the server will be affected as well. Also, if a shared account abuses server resources, the whole server will be impacted. Using a VPS is like owning a house with a 9 foot privacy fence. You won’t be bothered no matter what your neighbors are doing.
The most obvious and popular reason for a VPS is to run a single website, or multiple websites. However, you can use them for pretty much anything that requires access to the internet – such as a web application like Nextcloud to run your own Dropbox alternative – or to create your own virtual private network to better secure the internet connection of your PCs and mobile devices.

VPS ensures that your website continues to run smoothly, regardless of what is happening elsewhere on the server. It also protects your data from multiple sites, giving you a secure piece of virtual real estate to build a website on.
DreamHost has been a top hosting provider for several years. Their VPS plans come with a bunch of features that show real value for the price. The base package comes with 1GB RAM and 30GB SSD storage. Some of the core features include managed VPS security options, such as PHP release updates, manual security patches, latest WordPress security upgrades and more.

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For outgoing mail, this automatic presentation of the correct certificate doesn't work because Postfix doesn't support it. Instead, we have to sign the Postfix certificate with one certificate that contains every domain on the server that is used for autoconfigured outgoing mail (the LetsEncrypt limit is 100 domains). This means that the main domain in Virtualmin (the parent of the server hostname that we already used to sign the server certificate, let's call it myserver.com) must be configured at Virtualmin > Server Configuration > Website Options with "Default website for IP address?" set to "Yes" and for all other domains the setting "Website matches all sub-domains?" must be set to "No".
If you currently have a shared hosting plan, the main reason to move to a VPS hosting plan is resource utilization. The issue really isn’t that your website is running slow, but rather it needs to be able to handle more web traffic. Your current web host will usually inform you when you’re exceeding shared hosting resource limits. That’s the ideal time to switch to VPS. With a virtual private server, you’ll have your own operating system and dedicated resources for increased power. Your site will then be able to handle increased traffic. And, you’ll have even better insulation from other hosting customers.

Take a moment to read through our VPS Hosting reviews. Once you do, select your package. If you are wondering which management level or package will be your best VPS Hosting service, just ask our 24/7/365 Guru Crew Support team. They're standing by to help! Best of all, once you have selected your service after reading through our VPS Web Hosting reviews, you can try us completely risk free with our Anytime Money Back Guarantee. Get started now!


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So that’s it, then – a VPS is for everything in between, right? Well, yes…and no. A VPS (Virtual Private Server) is a flexible solution that falls in between shared and dedicated hosting, not only in price but also in the way it functions. Like a dedicated server, a site hosted on a VPS gets its own RAM and disk space; however, like a shared server, it uses the same processing capacity (CPU) as a certain number of other sites. So, while your site’s performance isn’t reliant on shared RAM and disk space, it is dependent on a shared processor. Moreover, the distribution of processor share varies from provider to provider.  The table below shows how most hosting companies break down the differences between shared, VPS, and dedicated hosting plans:
InMotion Hosting is refreshingly different. Its baseline VPS-1000HA-S plan doesn't have the most eye-catching price at $27.99 per month over two years, but it's easy to see why the company asks this much. The product has a better specification – 4GB RAM, 75GB storage, 4TB bandwidth, 3 dedicated IPs – than some high-end plans from other providers, backups and a cPanel licence are included for free, and there's a 90-day money-back guarantee.
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