To break things down a bit, cloud VPS (Virtual Private Server) hosting is when a web hosting provider takes one massive server and partitions it up so that it can have several servers on it, each of which can run its own operating system and can be re-booted independently.  Sounds simple enough.  So what is the difference between managed VPS and unmanaged VPS?
For someone managing multiple properties, or even one big property, managing email accounts can be a hassle. cPanel makes this process much easier, allowing you to add email addresses, access your email via webmail, set up email clients and choose the default email account for your site. Our VPS Hosting accounts also allow you to create an unlimited number of email addresses on your cPanel account.
Lastly, arguably the most significant advantage of VPS hosting comes at the highest price. You get root access and unparalleled control of the resources granted. That means that you can install a wide range of operating systems, work on resource-heavy projects and do much more, than with shared hosting. But sadly, the customer support team will only help you with questions relating to VPS hosting management and other back-end related queries.
A leading contributor to several large projects, an excellent open-source OS that provides a phenomenal experience right off the bat. Rolling releases will keep you on the cutting edge. Stable, performance oriented and backed up by a large community. Open Suse is great for projects due to the ability to make snapshots easily. Pair Open Suse and Hostinger VPS hosting to get the perfect platform.
When purchasing a VPS hosting package the web hosting provider will manage all the hardware and while you will have administrative access through a control panel to do whatever you want with your server, they will still make sure that it is available, has up-to-date system software, it is secured and has the available hardware resources to run according to the VPS package specification.

A Virtual Private Server (VPS) uses virtualization software to partition physical servers into multiple "virtual" servers—each having the ability to run its own operating system and applications. VPS is not for everyone, but is quickly becoming the hosting preference of choice for advanced Web developers who require root access to the server to run their own software.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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