You can create a VPC where instances in one subnet, such as web servers, communicate with the Internet while instances in another subnet, such as application servers, communicate with databases on your corporate network. An IPsec VPN connection between your VPC and your corporate network helps secure all communication between the application servers in the cloud and databases in your data center. Web servers and application servers in your VPC can leverage Amazon EC2 elasticity and Auto Scaling features to grow and shrink as needed. You can create a VPC to support this use case by selecting "VPC with Public and Private Subnets and Hardware VPN Access" in the Amazon VPC console wizard.
Alrighty than, wait to see if they'll be adding support for smartnofes. In case they don't have plans to include SMART soon, than since you're good with computers I suggest you rent a managed VPS and just dive in it. Once you get the hang of it, it's not hard. But if you will use it only for your smartnofe, than turn off any other service to minimize the attack surface (like apache, mail and other servers you won't need).
Our cloud provisioning system is able to rapidly deploy new servers after orders have been verified. The setup time for a VPS server actually varies depending on if you are using a Linux or Windows operating system. On Linux based servers you should see the VPS online within 15-30 minutes. For a Windows based server you will see the VPS online within 1-2 hours.
Increase your redundancy with VPS snapshots. We now offer two kinds of VPS snapshots: Live-State and Scheduled. While both are used to create full container backup of your Virtual Private Server as a failsafe to roll back to in case of any issues, Live-State Snapshots are meant as an on-demand feature while Scheduled Snapshots can create a snapshot up to once a day! Whether it's an operating system or programming language update/upgrade, or for something as simple as a single website edit, our snapshot features enable you to go back in time and revert your container to the exact state it was in when you took the snapshot, including technology versions, content and even live processes.
Sorry about the late timing!!!! I just bought a Panasonic cf-52 laptop with Win 10 PRO running on a Windows Vista COA. Well, I’d like to think your last statement STILL holds true for my efforts. …Can you confirm this? I’m primarily interested in running old OS’s such as WIN XP. or older windows OS’s…who knows maybe some DR-DOS files and .apps. I’m thinking I can stay away from migration and dedicated server machines and all that goes along with security issues. Thanks for any feed back.
To break things down a bit, cloud VPS (Virtual Private Server) hosting is when a web hosting provider takes one massive server and partitions it up so that it can have several servers on it, each of which can run its own operating system and can be re-booted independently.  Sounds simple enough.  So what is the difference between managed VPS and unmanaged VPS?
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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