For our fully managed VPS server we include an easy to use custom cPanel Control Panel that offers many administrative tools but basic knowledge of file transfer and application management are beneficial. Our semi-managed offering does not include the control panel and will require a more in depth technical expertise to keep your website running smoothly.
VPS hosting, on the other hand, provides you with dedicated resources that you don’t need to share. Every virtual private server hosting plan makes sure that you get the highest control of your resources. Control your CPUs, Burst RAM, manage root access and use your preferred OS. The downside of VPS hosting is that, while we cover the back-end and server monitoring, maintaining it 24/7, we can provide limited help to your project concerning customer support. While all VPS hosting and control panel questions we will help with, programming, coding and other queries of similar nature won't be covered.
Alrighty than, wait to see if they'll be adding support for smartnofes. In case they don't have plans to include SMART soon, than since you're good with computers I suggest you rent a managed VPS and just dive in it. Once you get the hang of it, it's not hard. But if you will use it only for your smartnofe, than turn off any other service to minimize the attack surface (like apache, mail and other servers you won't need).
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
×