A key aspect of VPS internet hosting is its virtualization capabilities. With VPS, the hosting provider divides each physical server into multiple smaller virtual servers with private and dedicated RAM and hard drive space. This provides site owners with a more isolated hosting environment without disruptions from other clients sharing server space.
A Hostway|HOSTING Virtual Private Server (VPS) solution puts you on a server with other clients, where each client shares the cost of running the server. Unlike shared hosting (e.g., FlexCloud), a virtual private server solution gives each client its own partitioned server area. You manage your own operating system (Linux or Windows), storage space, and memory to ensure your site’s performance and stability.
You can periodically backup your mission critical data from your datacenter to a small number of Amazon EC2 instances with Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes, or import your virtual machine images to Amazon EC2. In the event of a disaster in your own datacenter, you can quickly launch replacement compute capacity in AWS to ensure business continuity. When the disaster is over, you can send your mission critical data back to your datacenter and terminate the Amazon EC2 instances that you no longer need. By using Amazon VPC for disaster recovery, you can have all the benefits of a disaster recovery site at a fraction of the normal cost.
The main reason that someone signs up for a VPS is that they need a server through which to run their site. When you adopt one, you should notice that your site is performing better than it was on a shared account (because of the guaranteed allotment of resources). Also, the full root access gives you better control. You are able to install and get rid of whatever programs you want.
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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