As a result of VPS hosting's hybrid nature, its cost isn't quite as low as shared hosts' fees, but it's not nearly as high as dedicated hosts' fees. You can expect to pay between $20 per month and $100 per month, depending on the configuration. Shared web hosting, on the other hand, is extremely cheap hosting; you can often set up shop for less than $10 per month. Dedicated web hosting will typically set you back $100 per month or more.
You can periodically backup your mission critical data from your datacenter to a small number of Amazon EC2 instances with Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) volumes, or import your virtual machine images to Amazon EC2. In the event of a disaster in your own datacenter, you can quickly launch replacement compute capacity in AWS to ensure business continuity. When the disaster is over, you can send your mission critical data back to your datacenter and terminate the Amazon EC2 instances that you no longer need. By using Amazon VPC for disaster recovery, you can have all the benefits of a disaster recovery site at a fraction of the normal cost.
With the launch of InMotion Hosting’s new Self-Managed (Unmanaged) VPS product, SysAdmins and experienced developers have expressed a lot of enthusiasm for this new solution. But, the distinction has left others wondering which product would best serve their needs. One of the most common questions we have received has been “What is the difference between a managed and an unmanaged VPS, and which one should I choose?”
A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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