For plans or packages featuring unlimited websites, domains, or email accounts, we do not enforce any official limitations. Customers are able to utilize as many of these features as they wish. That said, these are of course not infinite resources and there are inherent maximums associated with the technology powering them. For example, while email account creation is unlimited, these rely on the file storage available on the account. Therefore customers need to be operating within the Terms of Service to ensure resources are available to fully enable email functionality. Customers operating within the Terms of Service have yet to come up against technical boundaries for email, domains, or websites.
Which VPS hosting plan to choose between a managed VPS and unmanaged VPS? Generally speaking, unmanaged VPS hosting is less expensive than managed VPS hosting when you compare plans that have the same allocated resources. One of the main reason is that your hosting provider offers less support on unmanaged VPS, thus they charge less for the service. If you are well-versed in VPS hosting and you have a lot of time planed for the VPS server, you can go for a unmanaged VPS. Otherwise, you should get a managed VPS. Some of the tech issues you may need to know if you choose unmanaged VPS include but not limited to: VPS security, software update and patching, LAMP server configuration (linux, apache, mysq, php), DNS configuration, control panel setup, SSL certificates creation, website setup, server backup, etc.
cPanel and WHM give you all the power you need when managing multiple sites, domains and clients. Create as many cPanel accounts as you need within WHM's account dashboard, assigning the cPanels to each respective property. Once set up and assigned, you can view usage, manage account stats, modify, upgrade or suspend accounts and much more. This allows you to manage your server exactly how you want it, including splitting your clients up for billing, resource and support purposes.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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