A VPS hosting provider relies on virtualization software, called a hypervisor, to abstract resources on a physical server and provide customers with access to an emulated server, called a virtual machine (VM). Each virtual machine runs a complete operating system, and has restricted access to a portion of the physical server's compute, memory and storage resources. Customers have access to the VM's OS, but not to the physical server.
Recently, we've added more-formal uptime monitoring to our review process, and the results show that most web hosts do an excellent job of keeping sites up and running. Even if they get everything else right, sites with uptime problems aren't eligible for high scores. All services suffer ups and downs, sometimes for reasons beyond their control. Those sites that fail to address the problem in a timely manner are penalized accordingly.
Our VPS Hosting plans all come with a high availability feature that essentially takes your VPS container, and empowers it with a cloud infrastructure. How does this work? We put a premium on your server's uptime, so we created an infrastructure of redundant hardware clusters that provides your partition with real-time redundancy. If for some reason there is an error on your server, there is another server in the cluster with that backup information ready to spin up. We utilize Virtuozzo, a virtualization solution built on top of OpenVZ.
A virtual machine (VM) is automatically assigned a private IP address from a range that you specify, based on the subnet it is deployed in. The address is retained by a VM until the VM is deleted. Azure dynamically assigns the next available private IP address from the subnet you create a VM in. Assign a static IP address if you want a specific IP address from the subnet assigned to the VM.
Unmetered hosting is generally offered with no limit on the amount of data-transferred on a fixed bandwidth line. Usually, unmetered hosting is offered with 10 Mbit/s, 100 Mbit/s or 1000 Mbit/s (with some as high as 10Gbit/s). This means that the customer is theoretically able to use ~3 TB on 10 Mbit/s or up to ~300 TB on a 1000 Mbit/s line per month, although in practice the values will be significantly less. In a virtual private server, this will be shared bandwidth and a fair usage policy should be involved. Unlimited hosting is also commonly marketed but generally limited by acceptable usage policies and terms of service. Offers of unlimited disk space and bandwidth are always false due to cost, carrier capacities and technological boundaries.[3]
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