As you can see, each of these options has its own advantages, so you will need to weigh the options and determine which one will best meet your site’s needs. Depending on the amount of traffic your site receives, the resources needed to maintain the best performance for your site’s users, or any other specifications that you might need to consider (such as high availability, disaster recovery, or load balancing), either option might be best for you. If you need help determining the ideal solution for your website, please contact us to speak to a hosting expert.
If you register a domain with Bluehost when signing up for a hosting account, there is a domain fee that is non-refundable. This not only covers our costs, but ensures that you won't lose your domain name. Regardless of the status of your hosting service, you'll be free to manage it, transfer it after any required lock periods, or simply point it elsewhere at your convenience. You retain ownership of your domain until the end of its registration period unless you elect to extend it. 

VMware, Cloud & DevOps Enthusiast! Author, Blogger and IT Infra & Ops Manager. Joe believes creating the best user experience is his top priority, which is why he's been sharing his ideas, experiences, and advice on VMinstall.com since 2007. Read more about Joe's motivation to help you "Learn to Create Great User Experiences and Become Indispensable". Feel free to send him a message here.


As the stepping stone between Shared Hosting and a Dedicated Server, VPS Hosting provides a powerful, reliable and scalable hosting option for a myriad of different uses and applications. Whether you have a growing business, are looking to set up an online store, building a portfolio or wanting to set up unique applications, VPS Hosting is capable of supporting a number of different situations and configurations. Learn more about which VPS Hosting option is right for you!
Most VPS hosts only offer servers running Linux-based operating systems; you'll need to dig a bit to find Windows-based VPS hosting. This is important to note if you're planning on running software that requires a Microsoft-compatible environment. That said, Linux-based VPS hosting will save you a few bucks; Linux servers usually cost $10 to $20 less than Windows servers.
The primary disadvantage to using a VPS is its lack of performance. The organization that provides the VPS will typically throttle the server's performance in an effort to maximize the number of VPSs that the physical server is able to accommodate. In the unlikely event that the VPS's performance is not throttled, it then becomes possible for an adjacent VPS to consume excessive resources, to the point of impacting the VPS's performance.

A VPS runs its own copy of an operating system (OS), and customers may have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, so they can install almost any software that runs on that OS. For many purposes they are functionally equivalent to a dedicated physical server, and being software-defined, are able to be much more easily created and configured. They are priced much lower than an equivalent physical server. However, as they share the underlying physical hardware with other VPSes, performance may be lower, depending on the workload of any other executing virtual machines.[1]
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