A Hostway|HOSTING Virtual Private Server (VPS) solution puts you on a server with other clients, where each client shares the cost of running the server. Unlike shared hosting (e.g., FlexCloud), a virtual private server solution gives each client its own partitioned server area. You manage your own operating system (Linux or Windows), storage space, and memory to ensure your site’s performance and stability.

Perhaps the best way to approach the virtual server is the idea of a virtual machine. A VM allows you to run an emulation of a computer within your computer, drawing on the resources of the physical one –  disk space, RAM, CPU, etc. This tactic allows you to run an entirely separate operating system (OS) solely for the purposes of the VM, even if its type and version of OS are identical to what’s on your hardware.
Every cloud vps plan is housed on redundant solid state drive (SSD) arrays using dependable hardware, and over 18 years of web hosting knowledge. We offer VPS, or virtual private server, solutions for Windows and Linux users alike, and strive to provide quality products and exceptional support. If you’re interested in VPS hosting for your organization, our unmanaged cloud vps plans have got you covered.
It provides you with even more options, including root access, access to Apache and PHP.ini (modification of PHP variables), and much more. You can also install an SSL certificate, and all software program types. In short, you get more freedom in terms of administering and configuring your server, without the hassle of managing any physical hardware.

cPanel is a powerful Linux-based control panel that simplifies managing, configuring and automating your web server, making your life easier. Included with cPanel is Web Host Manager (WHM), which streamlines server management tasks and allows you to run a scalable online business. All of our VPS Hosting plans include a FREE cPanel / WHM license, meaning you get all of the power and functionality these tools have to offer, at no extra cost to you. Below are some of the ways cPanel + WHM can improve your web hosting experience.


The web and server hosting world is full of abbreviations that look as though they were designed to confuse inexperienced hosting clients: IaaS, PaaS, SSD, SSL, VPN, VPS, and many more. It’s especially confusing when abbreviations are similar, but mean completely different things, as is the case with VPN and VPS. I’ve often heard hosting clients say VPN when they mean VPS, and vice versa.
I have some sites hosted on a shared-hosting/cpanel environment and need to make a move up. I have some experience running my own server, but it is very basic (a local box to do live testing/file serv). My question is how difficult is it to run a VPS, should I buy a managed VPS (with stuff already installed), or unmanaged (blank box), and lastly if I go for unmanaged what steps should I take to keep my VPS secure? Edit: Also how difficult is it to backup files and databases? Can it be automated?
As an acronym for Virtual Private Server, VPS is a type of hosting many businesses and digital publishers move on to after outgrowing their shared hosting plans. It is also referred to as a virtual dedicated server, or VDS Hosting. VPS hosting offer increased control and provide you with the ability to perform more advanced functions with your website. Unlike shared hosting, VPS server space is split up into self-contained units.
With our dedicated servers, you rent an entire server. This is optimal for people that have very high traffic to their websites or need to setup their server in a very specific way. Not everyone needs to have a fully dedicated web server however. If you're just getting started with your website, you can save quite a bit of money if you rent a small portion of the server. Shared hosting is when you share a portion of the server with other users rather than rent an entire server to yourself.
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koding.com has a free VM running Ubuntu. The specs are pretty good, 1 gig memory for example. They have a terminal online you can access through their website, or use SSH. The VM will go to sleep approximately 20 minutes after you log out. The reason is to discourage users from running live production code on the VM. The VM resides behind a proxy. Running web servers that only speak HTTP (port 80) should work just fine, but I think you'll get into a lot of trouble whenever you want to work directly with other ports. Many mind-like alternatives offer similar setups. Good luck!

A VPS is an excellent choice for web developers, webmasters, resellers, and for those who run resource-intensive websites. Each VPS Plan under Namecheap operates and performs exactly how an independent physical machine would, featuring security and flexibility for your websites, independence from neighbors, full control over your hosting environment, and Dedicated Server power. The best part? It's all at an affordable price.
Smaller websites with fewer pages and page views do just fine with standard shared hosting, and larger sites with hundreds of pages and thousands or millions of page views definitely need the features and benefits of dedicated server hosting. VPS internet hosting, on the other hand, is an ideal solution for medium-sized businesses and sites with a decent amount of regular traffic. Depending on where your site stacks up, there’s definitely a hosting solution out there for you. A2 Hosting has the affordable fast VPS Hosting solution to meet your needs.
VPS is short for a Virtual Private Server, which refers to the partitioning of a physical server into multiple servers. You can think of a VPS like a Dedicated Server, where you can enjoy all the components a Dedicated Server offers yet you pay a lower price. Each VPS also features its own OS (Operating System) and allows for separate rebooting. Since each OS receives a specific share of the resources from the physical server, each one is isolated from one another and cannot interfere.
Virtual Private Server (VPS) hosting definitely seems to be the future of the web hosting world. An unmanaged VPS hosting service is a solution that is completely under the control of the customer. Web hosting providers do not recommend such a service to people who don't know how to establish, manage, and function a web server; in such a case, managed VPS hosting provides a better solution.
Partitioning a single server to appear as multiple servers has been increasingly common on microcomputers since the launch of VMware ESX Server in 2001. The physical server typically runs a hypervisor which is tasked with creating, releasing, and managing the resources of "guest" operating systems, or virtual machines. These guest operating systems are allocated a share of resources of the physical server, typically in a manner in which the guest is not aware of any other physical resources save for those allocated to it by the hypervisor. As a VPS runs its own copy of its operating system, customers have superuser-level access to that operating system instance, and can install almost any software that runs on the OS; however, due to the number of virtualization clients typically running on a single machine, a VPS generally has limited processor time, RAM, and disk space.[2]
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